Question #1

Question #1:  A gas that exists at a temperature and pressure which it would ordinarily would be thought of as a liquid or solid is called a/an:

evaporation
volatile substance
vapor
condensation
sublimation


Question #2: The conversion of matter from a liquid state to the vapor state occurs within the body of the liquid through bubble formation is called:

sublimation.
evaporation.
boiling.
melting.
condensation.


Question #3:  The direct change from the solid state to the gaseous state without going through the liquid state is called:

sublimation.
evaporation.
boiling.
melting.
condensation.


Question #4: The conversion of matter from a solid state to the liquid state is called:

sublimation.
evaporation.
boiling.
melting.
condensation.


Question #5:  The process by which molecules escape from the liquid phase to the gas phase is called:

sublimation.
evaporation.
boiling.
melting.
condensation.


Question #6: The conversion of matter from a gaseous state to the liquid state is called:

sublimation.
evaporation.
boiling.
melting.
condensation.


Question #7: Which of the following processes are endothermic changes of state?

a.  boiling                d.  sublimation
b.  freezing               e.  melting
c.  condensation       f.  evaporation

only a
b and c
a, c, and f
a, d, e, and f
a and f


Question #8: Which of the following processes are exothermic changes of state?

a.  boiling                d.  sublimation
b.  freezing               e.  melting
c.  condensation       f.  evaporation

only a
b and c
a, c, and f
a, d, e, and f
a and f


Question #9: A change of state in which energy is given off is called:

endothermic.
exothermic.
equilibrium.
all of the above
none of the above


Question #10: A change of state in which energy is absorbed is called:

endothermic.
exothermic.
equilibrium.
all of the above
none of the above


Question #11: A condition in which two opposite processes take place at the same rate is called:

endothermic.
exothermic.
equilibrium.
all of the above
none of the above


Question #12: Arrange the following intermolecular forces in order of increasing strength:

  London forces, Dipole-dipole interactions, Hydrogen bonding
  Dipole-dipole interactions, Hydrogen bonding, London forces
  Hydrogen bonding, Dipole-dipole interactions, London forces
  Dipole-dipole interactions, London forces, Hydrogen bonding
  Hydrogen bonding, London forces, Dipole-dipole interactions  


Question #13: Which of the following chemicals is capable of hydrogen bonding intermolecular interactions:

a.  H2               d.  NH3
b.  H-O-H        e.  CH4
c.  H-S-H         f.  H-F

all of these chemicals
none of these chemicals
a, b, and c
b, d, and f
c and e